Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 6

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com
Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Complete a Tutorial
  2. Lines in Photoshop
  3. Feedback

Complete a Tutorial

Select a tutorial from below, complete it, add meta-data to the PSD file. Save as a JPEG and email a copy to me(with all relevant meta-data).

Lines in Photoshop

As we saw last week working with lines can be a lot of fun and create very dynamic results. Photoshop has many interesting options on using lines. Particularly the many effects that are part of Photoshop can lead to stunning results.

Windows Vista Aurora Effect – a good and reasonably easy to follow tutorial by a favourite site of mine: Tutorial9.

Vista Lighting Effect - Courtesy of: Tutorial9

Vista Lighting Effect – Courtesy of: Tutorial9

Luminescent Lines – this tutorial from a great Photoshop tutorial site – PSD Learning – looks at customising brush dynamics. Fun to do and an interesting start: use a photo to create a suprisingly abstract and attractive background. A good tutorial to try on your own.

Luminescent Lines - Courtesy of: PSDLearning

Luminescent Lines – Courtesy of: PSDLearning

Gentle Curves of Pure Light – follow the tutorial from PhotoshopEssentials in class to create gentle curves with the pen tool and turn them into bright light.

Light Streaks - Courtesy of: PhotoshopEssentials

Light Streaks – Courtesy of: PhotoshopEssentials

Abstract Background – this is a more basic tutorial from YourPhotoshopGuide. It is good to introduce the Lens Flare filter and makes good use of the Free Transform and copy layer options.

Luminescent Twirls- Courtesy of: YourPhotoshopGuide

Luminescent Twirls- Courtesy of: YourPhotoshopGuide

Wavy Blackberry Style Wallpaper – this is a great tutorial from psdtuts+. It consists of 16 steps, but the result is convincing and you will learn a few good techniques on how to work with gradients and how to add depth to your work.

Lines and Gradients- Courtesy of: psdtuts+

Lines and Gradients- Courtesy of: psdtuts+

Lines Tutorial – follow the in-class instructions to create an image like the one below. I basically used the Brush tool and drew straight lines. Next I multiplied layers (Ctrl+J) and changed the layer blending mode.

I added a photo, in the example a photo of Grace Kelly and masked selections.

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Other links with many excellent tutorials:

40 Cool Abstract and Background Photoshop Tutorials – by Hongkiat Lim

25 Useful Photoshop Background Tutorials | Vandelay Design Blog

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 5

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com
Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Lines
  2. Lines in Design
  3. Feedback

Lines

Warm-up

We will look at lines today with fresh eyes (I hope). Line can be defined as having a starting point and an end point and the connection between the two is what the line actually is.

Lines are quite an amazing tool for many creators: when drawing the caricaturist uses lines to create his mean contortions to display a fatter, bolder, thinner, long nosed, big mouthed version of his subject. A writer uses lines to create text filled with meaning.

A graph shows the changes in the economy and an arrow points at something.

Lines can be a powerful tool of expression and we will start today’s class with a blank sheet of paper and a pencil.

Draw 5 lines to express 5 concepts, themes or emotions. Below are examples:

  • forgetfulness
  • playfulness
  • sadness
  • happiness
  • searching
  • excited
  • technology
  • nature
  • anything that you come up with …

About Lines

What is a line?

A line is a fundamental design and art element. We describe the world around us with line drawings. We draw the contour or outline of objects and shapes that we see around us to define them on a sheet of paper, a canvas or other 2D platform. This was already established by our forefathers who used the walls of caves as their canvas to depict the world around them.

Work by Egon Schiele, found at Mom.org
Work by Egon Schiele, found at Mom.org

The illustration is by Viennese artist Egon Schiele (pronounced: Sheelah) and you notice how lines are used to display the outlines and expression of a man. The lines do not exist as such in life, a person does not have a contour line around them and their eyes are not two curved lines either.

So, lines are used as a form of expression. Lines are borrowed in drawings to create shapes and outlines.

The function of a line in design (and art) goes beyond that though.

First and foremost in an abstract sense a line is something that we perceive more than view. It gives us a sense of direction. In this sense lines seem to always have one or more directions.

The swirls in the image are made up of numerous lines. Courtesy of: www.openprocessing.org
The swirls in the image are made up of numerous lines. Courtesy of: http://www.openprocessing.org

The lines in the image above seem to move from left to right if you are of a culture that reads from left to right.

Characteristics

Lines can be looked at by characteristics:

  • Length
  • Weight (darkness/thickness)
  • Direction

Basic Applications

Lines can be looked at by their basic application:

  • Outline describes the outer boundary of a two-dimensional shape.
  • Contour is the use of line to define the edge of an object and emphasize the volume or mass of the form.
  • Gestural lines are quick marks that capture the impression of a pose or movement.
  • Implied lines are suggested or broken lines that are completed with your imagination through the concept of closure. An arrow is used to suggest a direction or path for the eye to follow.
  • Calligraphy is beautiful, expressive marks. An expressive stroke freely uses the characteristics of line to convey emotion to the viewer, much like an individual’s handwriting changes with different moods.
  • Analytical line is a formal use of line. Analytical line is closer to geometry with its use of precise and controlled marks. A grid is a very popular analytical use of visual line as a way to organize a design. The Golden Section is an example of the traditional use of analytical classical line, which uses calculated implied lines to bring unity to the structure of a painting composition.
  • Modeling line is used to create the illusion of volume in drawing. Hatching is the use of parallel lines to suggest value change. Parallel lines on another angle can be added to create cross-hatching to build up a gradation and more value in areas of a drawing.
  • Directional lines suggest movement or a path of vision and have specific connotations associated with them for example: Vertical lines suggest power and authority; horizontal lines suggest peace and tranquility. Together they give a feeling of calm and stability. Diagonal lines suggest tension; curved lines are graceful and fluid. Together they create a feeling of stress and movement.
    Linear perspective can be applied to drawing to create the illusion of depth on a two-dimensional surface.  (Source: http://www.onlineartcenter.com/line.html)

Lines in Design

Look at the example below of lines in design from a Google search:

Lines Google Image Search
Lines Google Image Search

Click on the image above and save 5 -10 images to inspire you to create a Photoshop generated image that displays lines as a rhythmic component.

Before you save the file and email it to me, make sure to include the Meta Data.

Below is an example of a Photoshop generated study incorporating a portrait of the US-American actress Grace Kelly (image can be found at: GettingCheeky) with straight lines at different angles and a wallpaper found on FreeFever.com.

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 3

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Assessment 1
  2. Feedback

Assessment 1

Today we will work on Assessment HTML Website.

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 2

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Introduction
  2. Applying Meta Data in HTML
  3. Create an Image for a Web Page
  4. Email the Example
  5. Student Examples
  6. Feedback

Introduction

Today we will look at how to create meta tags in HTML and where to place the information.

Applying Meta Data in HTML

Meta Tags for Web Pages

Create a HTML file with all the meta tags for:

  • keywords
  • description
  • author

Use the W3School’s TryItEditor or Notepad to write your code.

Follow this link to see how it is done: The HTML Head Element.

Save your html file and move to the next task.

Create an Image for a Web Page

Use photoshop to create a photo montage image like the one below.

Search for specific technique: Photomontage

Artform that became extremely popular in the early 20th Century. Particularly popular in German Expressionism and Dadaism. Click the images for links to the original images or sites:

Photomontage: Amir Ebrahim Photography

Photomontage: Amir Ebrahim Photography

Massive Attack - The Essential Mix

Massive Attack – The Essential Mix

Create the Image in Photoshop

Create a similar photomontage to the one above by Amir Ebrahim Photography. Find a photo to base it on and copy and paste layers and change the image colour and tone.

Make sure to apply the meta data to the final product before saving it as a JPEG and PSD.

Email the JPEG

Email the JPEG to me.

Student Examples

Below are examples by students:

to be posted

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 1

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Introduction
  2. Applying Meta Tags
  3. Applying Meta Data in Photoshop
  4. Creating a Poster in Photoshop
  5. Feedback

Introduction

Analyse Information and Assign Meta Tags is a unit that focusses on:

  • Identify the purpose of the meta-tags
    What will they need to communicate?
  • Analyse the material that needs to be stored as meta data
    What information needs to be stored as meta data?
  • Create meta tags
  • Test and monitor meta tags

Attached is the unit of competency: ICAWEB510A Analyse Data and Assign Meta Tags

Please read the text word by word and … no actually, let us move to greener pastures:

Applying Meta Tags

It would help to actually know what meta tag means:

A meta tag is basically a tag in HTML that describes the contents of a Web page.

We will look at different ways to apply meta data to files:

  • Applying meta data with Photoshop
  • Applying meta data with Adobe Bridge
  • Applying meta data with meta tags in HTML

Applying Meta Data in Photoshop

Question to the class: why do you think it is important to apply meta data in the first place?

Do not read any further…

We will apply meta data in Photoshop with File>File Info… or with the shortcut: Alt+Shift+Ctrl+I.

This opens a window and you will be able to enter information in there. Let us focus on a title, the name of the creator (you) a copyright statement, a description and keywords.

Creating a Poster in Photoshop

Before you can apply any data to a Photoshop document though, you need to have a Photoshop document. So, let us begin with some fun:

In 1:20h create a poster that is inspired by either Swiss International Style, Constructivism or the Vietnamese Propaganda Poster.

Feel free to use some of your own art work or appropriate imagery found online.

Make sure to apply the meta data to the final product before saving it as a JPEG and PSD.

E-mail the JPEG to me! 🙂

Inspirations for today’s task:

Swiss International Style – an iconic style of graphic design from the 1950s, strongly influenced by the ideals of the German Bauhaus – Click the image for a Google search on Swiss Style:

Swiss International Style Screenshot Google

Swiss International Style

Swiss International Style

Constructivism – The immensely graphic art and propaganda style of Communist Russia, or to be more precise, of the Soviet Union. Early 1920s – 1940s. Click the image for a Google search on Constructivism:

Constructivism

Constructivism

Vietnamese Propaganda Posters – this is a particular style popular in Communist Vietnam. Visually very flat with the use of rich patterns and stunning in colour scheme. I feel very attracted to this style. Vietnam particularly in 1960s and 1970s. Click the image for a Google search on Vietnamese Propaganda Poster:

Vietnamese Propaganda Poster

Vietnamese Propaganda Poster

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Student Examples

Below are examples by students:

Milk Poster - Swiss International Style Reference - by Annabel Stephen Salip

Milk Poster – Swiss International Style Reference – by Annabel Stephen Salip

Constructivism Reference - by Lylah Livingston

Constructivism Reference – by Lylah Livingston

Pink Ribbon Day - Swiss International Style Reference - by Hwan Rochanabuddhi

Pink Ribbon Day – Swiss International Style Reference – by Hwan Rochanabuddhi

Zig Zag - Swiss International Style Reference - by Nawras Shakeer

Zig Zag – Swiss International Style Reference – by Nawras Shakeer

 

Peace- Swiss International Style Reference - by Maryam Chananeh

Peace- Swiss International Style Reference – by Maryam Chananeh