Lines and Curves

When you are creating artwork you will use a variety of design elements. The better your understanding of design elements the easier you will be able to communicate with your graphics.

Design Elements

There are a variety of design elements. On basic terms we are referring to any aspect that contributes to the final graphic. Design elements include:

  • Dot or Point
  • Line
  • Shape
  • Form
  • Value
  • Colour
  • Texture

The Line

We will focus on the Line and the impact a line can have visually, aesthetically and psychologically. Definition: a line is a path with a beginning and an end. It can be defined as the connection between a start point and an end point. Generally a line has one direction, but that direction can be unclear or ambiguous. Lines are 1 dimensional and can vary in style, thickness, direction and length. A line can be real or it can be imaginary or implied. How we understand a line is directly related to our environment and how we understand our environment. A hunter in the stone age needed to read his environment to ensure his survival and successful hunt. Let us look at some lines based on position in detail.

Horizontal Line

A horizontal line suggests calm and a resting position. Humans and most animals will take a horizontal position when resting . Cows seem to be an exception, they sleep in a standing position. If we relate this to our prehistoric ancestor he would view an animal or a stranger in a resting position as less of a threat. A horizontal line may give the illusion of space. In a landscape the horizontal line goes from left to right and suggests continuation of the landscape to both sides. Vertical lines in repetition emphasise stability. Vertical lines have a relaxing effect.

The calming effect of horizontal lines, image: courtesy of flickr.com, Photographer: jaikdean

The calming effect of horizontal lines, image: courtesy of flickr.com, Photographer: jaikdean

Vertical Line

Vertical lines are less stable and give a sense of height. The higher the vertical line reaches the more it can be read as something powerful, heavenly and beyond our reach. Depending on the object vertical lines can give a feeling of change and growth (eg a forest of tall vertical trunks). In architecture the use of vertical lines can give a sense of height and power. Vertical lines can be perceived as a threat, as in a standing person. Our prehistoric ancestor would view strangers and animals in a standing position as awake and potentially aware of his presence. They may even observe him. Vertical lines in repetition can create a strong rhythm. Vertical lines can be perceived as moody.

Vertical lines of a dark fence, image courtesy of p.ic - Photo Internet Collection - www.photoic.wordpress.com, photographer: Federico Viola

Vertical lines of a dark fence, image courtesy of p.ic – Photo Internet Collection – http://www.photoic.wordpress.com, photographer: Federico Viola

Diagonal Line

A diagonal line suggests movement. Objects in diagonal positions can appear unstable, either they are about to fall (as in the image of a falling tree) or they are in motion (a sprinter). In an image that shows perspective the diagonal lines depict the highest and lowest point of a row objects receding into the horizon. The line seems to commence with the object in front and recedes to the vanishing point on the horizon. Diagonal lines will draw the viewer’s gaze into the image. Diagonal lines are very powerful and seemingly in motion. Diagonal lines in repetition emphasise movement and can create a strong rhythm. Diagonal lines can be related to chaos and instability.

Combined Horizontal and Vertical Lines

The combination of the two lines will combine elements of the horizontal line with the qualities of the vertical line. A grid will look extremely stable and strong. A low and wide object will appear stable. A high object will appear strong and important. The rectilinear nature of the lines suggest a building or object that has been built and is structurally stable.

Curve

The lines to this point were related to positioning. The curve is related to the flow of the line. When a line is straight it adds little in the form of character or personality to the line. A straight line looks static and the positioning is the only indicator to the position or level of movement. A curve is very different to that. A curve is energetic and implies change of direction or motion. Gentle curves convey slow, gentle movement and remind us of the sensual qualities of a human body. Gentle curves can have a very pleasing and softening influence on a picture. Like the horizontal line a gentle curve can be relaxing, but it is also stimulating. Sharp curves convey fast, abrupt movements. This can be read as chaos or violent movement, like the struggle for victory between a predator and its prey. Sharp curves and twists can give a composition a chaotic and intense feel.

The gentle curve of the river and the light green tones of the grass give this image a calming feel. The montains and the clouds have a less calming effect. Image: courtesy of Icon Photography School - http://www.photographyicon.com/line/

The gentle curve of the river and the light green tones of the grass give this image a calming feel. The montains and the clouds have a less calming effect. Image: courtesy of Icon Photography School – http://www.photographyicon.com/line/

Steel Curves, Image: courtesy of flickr.com, photographer: Margeois.

Steel Curves, Image: courtesy of flickr.com, photographer: Margeois.

Twisted Curves - Two Wrestlers, Scott Winston and Brandon Hatchett , image: courtesy of Andrew Mills/The Star-Ledger, found at NJ.com True Jersey

Twisted Curves – Two Wrestlers, Scott Winston and Brandon Hatchett , image: courtesy of Andrew Mills/The Star-Ledger, found at NJ.com True Jersey

Continuous Lines

Continuous lines refer to lines either as a drawn, printed or as the continuation of the edge of a shape or object. We draw our world with the aid of lines, yet in reality there are no lines, but shapes and objects. There are different types of lines distinguishable by their quality: continuous, broken, dotted, thick, thin, hair lines, light, dark, in colour, even, uneven, etc. Every line is treating a subject in a certain way and therefore has a strong impact on the viewer’s emotions and understanding of the work. Lines can add emphasis and give depth to an object. Read more about the quality of lines at a later post.

Implied Line

An implied line may be a connection of objects or the continuation of a rhythm, it can be the continuation of an arrow or pointer or the path of the direction of someone’s eyes looking. It can be a person pointing at something with the index finger.

Michael Pointing in GTA V - Courtesy of Rockstar

Michael Pointing in GTA V – Courtesy of Rockstar

Implied lines are very powerful tools of the graphic designer. A psychological study conducted by researchers at the universities of Exeter and Lincoln found that biological cues, such as eye-gazing and finger-pointing were far more powerful to the human psyche than text-based (left, right) or icon-based cues (arrows). The reasons for this may lay in the fact that a biological cue relates to how we may read a person and a person’s body language. A person might pass on important cues to us with their body language. Looking at something may be a hint that was not given intentionally by the sender (of the information). Read more at: Psychology Study Points to Giving Arrow the Finger at University of Lincoln site. Gestures are powerful visual cue used in graphic design and were ever-present in art of many epochs. Renaissance painters like Michelangelo or Leonardo da Vinci placed visual cues into their paintings that were an indication of the artist’s views, it could represent criticism or say something about the subject. Leonardo’s Last Supper depicting the Jesus at his last supper with his apostles. Each of the hand gestures represent a message or code. There are many examples of finger-pointing in paintings, Michelangelo’s famous ‘Creation of Adam’ that can be found in the Sistine Chapel shows God reaching out to touch Adam. He seems to point at him with his index finger.

Michelangelo's Creation of Adam, Sistine Chapel, Rome, Courtesy of www.livescience.com

Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam, Sistine Chapel, Rome, Courtesy of http://www.livescience.com

Many paintings show someone pointing towards heaven. This might show the importance of heaven in Christian belief. In Leonardo’s painting of St. John the Baptist it is believed to signify salvation through baptism that John the Baptist represents.

Leonardo's St. John the Baptist, Louvre, Paris, Image: courtesy of A World History of Art - www.all-art.org

Leonardo’s St. John the Baptist, Louvre, Paris, Image: courtesy of A World History of Art – http://www.all-art.org

In 1914 a poster design by British designer Alfred Leere featured a picture of the British secretary of state for war, Lord Kitchener, pointing directly at the viewer, above the words “wants you.”

Britons, Lord Kitchener Wants You! Propaganda poster design from WWI by Alfred Leere. Image: courtesy of WorldWarEra.com

Britons, Lord Kitchener Wants You! Propaganda poster design from WWI by Alfred Leere. Image: courtesy of WorldWarEra.com

This design carried a powerful message that would stay with the viewer long after seeing the poster. One can only imagine what that poster did to the minds of young men of the early 20th Century. The Leere poster that was released became quite an icon and the concept of the finger pointing at the viewer has been reused in other recruitment posters of WWI and in other designs ever after. The Uncle Sam poster was released in 1916 and became possible more famous in a commercial context.

Uncle Sam Wants You, WWI Propaganda Poster for US Army recruits, Design by James Montgomery Flagg, 1916, image found at: Live Auctioneers

Uncle Sam Wants You, WWI Propaganda Poster for US Army recruits, Design by James Montgomery Flagg, 1916, image found at: Live Auctioneers

The concept was used on the German side as well with this 'Auch du sollst beitreten zur Reichswehr' [You too should join the German Army], design by  Julius Engelhard, Image: courtesy of mental_floss

The concept was used on the German side as well with this ‘Auch du sollst beitreten zur Reichswehr’ [You too should join the German Army], design by Julius Engelhard, Image: courtesy of mental_floss

  This concept has been picked up in a more commercial context. Below are two interesting examples from Emily the Strange and a concept for a lipstick advertisement by Samantha Cain.

I Want You - Emily Strange, The lovable Emily Strange came to life in 1991, designed by Nathan Carrico for Santa Cruz Skateboards. She is referred to as a counterculture icon. I would just call her a sceptic. Image found at: Kollectable Kaos

I Want You – Emily Strange, The lovable Emily Strange came to life in 1991, designed by Nathan Carrico for Santa Cruz Skateboards. She is referred to as a counterculture icon. I would just call her a sceptic. Image found at: Kollectable Kaos

Your Lipstick Needs You, an entertaining take by Digital Media Artist Samantha Cain. Courtesy of: Samantha Cain, http://www.behance.net/samanthacain

Your Lipstick Needs You, an entertaining take by Digital Media Artist Samantha Cain. Courtesy of: Samantha Cain, http://www.behance.net/samanthacain

Applying the eye gaze and pointing finger to a design piece can add a clear flow and focus to your design and assist the Visual Hierarchy and message of your work.

Also read:

More on Lines @ RAE, Research and Exploration

10 Top Photography Composition Rules at PM – Photography Mad

21 World War I Recruitment Posters From Around the Globe on mental_floss by Jill Harness

The paper Giving subjects the eye and showing them the finger: Socio biological cues and saccade generation in the anti-saccade task by Nicola J Gregory and Timothy L Hodgson was published in Perception, 2012 , Volume 41, Issue 2, pages 131-147. http://www.perceptionweb.com/abstract.cgi?id=p7085 Who is Emily the Strange? on http://www.emilystrange.com by HumanCat

Photoshop + PDF Class 5

Link to all Classes     Class 1     Class 2     Class 3    Class 4     Class 5     Class 6

Today we will look at:

  • Custom Shape Tool
  • Layer Blending Options
  • Today’s Task

Custom Shape Tool

The Custom Shape Tool allows you to draw custom shapes. These are actually vector graphics, which is uncommon in Photoshop.

Custom Shapes and Custom Shape Icon

Custom Shapes and Custom Shape Icon

The Custom Shape Tool can be activated with the U shortcut and by scrolling through the shape tool options using Shift+U until the custom shape tool appears. Load all custom shapes in the options (in CS6 click on the cog or in earlier versions click on the arrow). Use any of the shapes that you like. I opted for the dog and the cat with a rounded rectangle in the background.

Draw shapes by dragging the cursor. Hold shift to keep the proportion.

Layer Blending Options

Double click around the name of the layer.

Double click around the name of the layer.

Activate the Layer Blending Options by double clicking next to the name of a layer (in the Layer Palette) in the high-lighted area (not the thumbnail). In class I will give an introduction to the various options. I want you to focus on the Stroke option. Click on the word (not just the tickbox) and change the colour of the outline.

Vary your line thickness on the different shapes.

Next click on the words Blending Options: Custom and reduce the Fill Opacity to 0%

Next click on the words Blending Options: Custom and reduce the Fill Opacity to 0%

Next click on the words Blending Options: Custom and reduce the Fill Opacity to 0% and vary the Fill Opacity with the different shapes.

Today’s Task

Create an image with shapes that have outlines and no or low Fill Opacity.

Suggested dimensions:

Web Preset, 800px(width) x 600px (height) 72ppi (resolution). Save your work for on-screen viewing, as JPEG or PNG.custom shapes 02

Photoshop + PDF Class 4

Link to all Classes     Class 1     Class 2     Class 3    Class 4     Class 5     Class 6

Today we will look at:

  • Creative Commons
  • Layer Blending Modes
  • Layer Masks
  • Gradient Tool and Layer Mask
  • Today’s Task

We will focus the majority of today’s time on you practicing Photoshop. After the completion of your tasks I will expect you to stay and practice more. Class time is the time when I will be able to assist and the time for you to experiment with the software.

So, today we will have fun and afterwards will have some more fun until the imaginary bell rings to announce the end of class.

Creative Commons

Creative Commons or the Creative Commons License relates to a way to distribute content, such as photos and other images for free. Last week’s sample photo of the Ameland geese by F Schouwenburg is under the Creative Commons License.

Source: Flickr - photographer: Frans Schouwenburg
Source: Flickr – photographer: Frans Schouwenburg

Creative Commons are generally used for non-commercial and educational purpose. If someone makes a profit with a product they should pay for the image they use.

Generally, the author, creator or owner of the content needs to be mentioned. So, in short, when using images from Creative Commons sources ensure that you mention the source of your image.

This can be done in various ways. One would be to place a tag underneath the image with the source as you see it done in this blog.

CConFlickR
Creative Commons on FlickR

There are different forms of Creative Commons and it pays to read the details beforehand. To the right is another example from FlickR:

Examples of Creative Commons Resources

Try out the Links to Creative Commons to the right of this post:

Your task: find a photo to suit the themes Urban environment and blue skies with each search and download the image. Include the meta data of the photographer and source of website with the photo.

Try this link for more Creative Commons information.

Layer Blending Modes

First start a new Photoshop document. Place one of your new photos into it. Place your second photo as well.

The Layer Blending Mode can be accessed through the Layers panel. A text box (Win) with the word Normal or a small button (Mac) indicate the Layer Blending Mode box.

Look at your layer blending mode with the top layer active. Try the layer blending modes below and see how amazingly easy Photoshop lets you change the appearance by creating a blend between two images.

Now click on this link and access the tutorial on Layers TV Episode 105 about how to use the Layer Blending Mode.

Layer Mask

If you completely watched the tutorial in the link above, you will already know how to create a layer mask and can proceed to the task for today.

Last week we looked at clipping masks and today we look at a layer mask. The process is very similar. Make a selection on your active layer and click on the Layer Mask button (add a layer mask) beneath the Layers panel. Your selection is still visible and the rest has disappeared.

You can also create a layer mask from a selection by going to the main menu: Layer>Layer Mask>Reveal Selection. (see image)

Layer_Mask

Alternatively (press Ctrl+Z or Cmd+Z) you can hide what you have selected: if you use the Layer Mask button press Alt at the same time to hide your selection with the Mask. You can do the same from the main menu: Layer>Layer Mask>Hide Selection.

While the layer mask is selected you will be in the mask mode. You can use the brush to add or take away from your layer mask. If you use the brush (while in mask mode) you can  make parts disappear by drawing with black as foreground colour. You can equally make things reappear by drawing with white as foreground colour.

Using Gradient Tool with Layer Mask

A good tool to use is the gradient tool with the layer mask. You can create a gradient mask that way, which means the image will gradually become invisible. See image below.

French Ancient City Banner
French Ancient City Banner – Source: Image Base – Free Stock Photography Click the image as a link.

You can see the gradient used on the right part of the image. This is how you do it:

  1. Create a new document (use dimensions below)
  2. Place an image and change size as you see fit (press Enter)
  3. Create a layer mask (click the layer mask button)
  4. Activate the gradient and drag from one part to another within the imageIf white is your foreground colour the image will become invisible in the direction of your dragging. If black was your foreground colour the image will be invisible on your first point and become visible in your dragging direction.

For a more detailed tutorial on how to use the Layer Mask in Photoshop go to: PhotoshopEssentials.com

Today’s Task

Create a banner for a website using two images that blend into each other (use Layer Blending Modes and Layer masks) with a title, either use your name or an imaginary title.

Image by Alvimann found on morgueFile.com

Image by Alvimann found on morgueFile.com

Image by Noboru found on morgueFile.com

Image by Noboru found on morgueFile.com

Urban Stories Banner by F.Viola

Urban Stories Banner by F.Viola

The images must suit the themes:

  • Urban environment
  • Blue Skies

Dimensions of banner: 980px(width) x 174px (height) 72ppi (resolution)

Task_New Document

Add a title to the banner, that preferably also blends with the background images. Save the file as a PNG file. Keep a copy of this file and the 2 images that you have used. Upload your work onto MyKangan.

Examples of Student Submissions:

Layer Blending  Masks Banner
Banner by Vlad K
Banner by Yong Wu
Banner by Yong W
Banner by Mike T
Banner by Mike T

Photoshop + PDF Class 3

Link to all Classes     Class 1     Class 2     Class 3     Class 4      Class 5     Class 6

Welcome to your third Photoshop class. Be honest: did you practice what you have learnt last week? Make sure to practice Photoshop as much as you can, preferably daily. If you create a habit and make it fun your learning curve will be steep. If you are to busy to practice every day, try more than once a week.

Only practice will help you learn!Photo by  BreonWarwick on morgueFile
Only practice will help you learn! Photo by BreonWarwick on morgueFile

Today we will look at:

  1. The Layer panel
  2. How to create a new layer
  3. How to move layers
  4. How to make a layer active
  5. How to hide and show a layer
  6. How to link layers
  7. How to group layers
  8. How to delete layers
  9. How to draw shapes
  10. How to create a clipping mask
  11. How to use the Gaussian Blur
  12. How to rasterize a layer
  13. How to merge two layers and
  14. How to flatten an image

You can see that we will be rather busy. You will also need to provide me with an image as a result.

If you already now all of the tasks above you can do this straight away –

Your Tasks for this class:

Task 1 – Start a new document – 700x500px at 150ppi (pixels/inch) resolution and background contents set to transparent. Create a clipping mask with a rounded rectangle (fill most of the document space and with a 40px radius) of a photo of geese in Ameland, inthe Netherlands by Frans Schouwenburg. The photo is available under Creative Commons agreement and can be found on Flickr.com. If you cannot open the file get it from here:

Geese in Ameland, Photo by Frans Schouwenburg

Geese in Ameland, Photo by Frans Schouwenburg

Create a Gaussian blur (7.4px) of the clipping mask and flatten the image. Save as a JPEG with this title: Class3_T1_Your_full_name.jpg (example: Class3_T1_Toni_Varsetti.jpg). Upload the file to MyKangan and keep a copy of the JPEG.

Task 2 – Use the same document from task 1 or start a new document – 700x500px at 150ppi (pixels/inch) resolution and background contents set to transparent. Type the initials of your name in Impact Regular 200pt. If you have not done so in task 1, download the image of the geese in Ameland (see Task 1 for link). Place the file in your document (File>Place). When excepting the size make sure that the image is larger than the initials. Finally create a clipping mask (the photos should only appear inside the text now). Save the file as a PNG with this title: Class3_T2_Your_full_name.png (example: Class3_T2_Toni_Varsetti.png). Upload the file to MyKangan and keep a copy of the PNG.

The Layer Panel

The ability to create layers is a central aspect of Photoshop. It works like a collage, you place one photo on top of another and the one on top covers up the photos below it.

Layers Panel - Source: The Graphic Designer's Digital Toolkit, Alan Wood, 5th Edition, 2011
Layers Panel – Source: The Graphic Designer’s Digital Toolkit, Alan Wood, 5th Edition, 2011
layer_drop_menu
Layer Drop Menu Click image to see larger version

The Layer palette is located in the bottom right-hand corner with a tab called LAYERS. There are two menu items you should be aware of in the drop down main menu: Layers and Window.

Click on Layers to see a lot of actions that you can perform with layers. (See image) You can perform these functions directly from the layers palette as well, by clicking on the Layer Options Tab (small icon in the top right of the layers palette).

Click on Window in the main menu and see Layers ticked. This is were you can activate the Layer palette if you cannot see it on your screen. (If you are using a Windows PC notice the shortcut F7? This allows you to activate or deactivate the layers palette.)

Please read all the options of the image of the Layers panel (above) before advancing.

How to create a new Layer

  • You can simply click on the small icon in the Layers panel that looks like a sheet of paper (too slow)
  • You click on the Layer tab in the menu bar: Layer>New>Layer (too slow) or
  • You use the short cut: Ctrl+Shift+Alt+N (Mac: command+shift+option+N) – Nice! This will immediately create a new layer on top of your active layer.
  • You can use this short cut: Ctrl+Shift+N. This will open a options panel before the layer is created.
Layers in Photoshop are like a Collage of images stuck on top of each other...
Layers in Photoshop are like a Collage of images stuck on top of each other… Monkey photo by deanjenkins and Green photo by omdur, both on morgueFile

How to move a Layer

  • Drag the layer in the layer panel into the new position. You can move it up (=on top of other layers in the workspace) or down (it will be partly hidden by layers above. This is an easy and intuitive way. You will need to sometimes move it right between two layers and wait for a dark line to appear before releasing the layer.
  • You can also use the shortcuts: Ctrl+[ (or Cmd+[ on Mac) to move the layer up and Ctrl+] (or Cmd+] on Mac) to move the layer down.
  • You can use the Menu bar:  Layer>Arrange>Bring Forward (or Backward)

How to make a Layer active or inactive

A layer needs to be active for you to be able to work with the artwork on the layer. Photoshop allows you to work on one layer at the time.

  • The active layer is high-lighted or shaded (generally it is the layer with the blue background and white text in the layers panel.)
  • To activate a layer simply click on the layer in the layer panel

If you want to select numerous layers hold the Ctrl button (Mac: Cmd) while selecting more layers.

How to hide and show a Layer

You can make the content of a layer invisible by clicking on the eye icon in the Layers panel. Clicking it again will make the content visible.

How to link Layers

Linking layers can be done by selecting numerous layers (with Ctrl) and then clicking on the chain symbol in the Layers panel.

How to group Layers

Group layers by selecting numerous layers and then either pressing Ctrl+G (Mac Cmd+G) or create a new group by clicking the Create a new group icon in the Layers panel (it looks like a folder) and drag any layer you want into it.

How to delete Layers

The easiest way is to select the layer and hit Backspace; this happens immediately.

If you are the old school type you might to simply drag the layer into the bin icon or click the bin icon and press enter to delete the layer.

How to draw Shapes

Using the Custom Shape Tool to draw a Rabbit - The rabbit is below the grass
Using the Custom Shape Tool to draw a Rabbit – The rabbit is below the grass

Before you draw a shape place an image in the document (File>Place). In the example I have placed a photo of grass (found on http://www.morguefile.com > Petersphoto)

There are several tools that allow you to draw shapes. They basically draw vector graphic shapes that are linked to a layer. Try the Rounded Rectangle Tool tool. (If the tool is not visible, hold down the Rectangle tool near the bottom of the toolbox.) The shortcut is U – and Shift+U allows you to scroll through the tools options (it should be the second.)

Draw a rounded rectangle with a 25px radius (drag to draw). You will notice that drawing a shape will create a new layer as a default!

Try the other drawing tools as well.

I chose the rabbit custom shape. To find it choose the custom shape tool, it looks like a blob, see the sample images! Then go into the options menu bar and select the down arrow next to the custom shape (most likely a black arrow). This will open all the different custom shapes. Next click on the small outward arrow head in the top right of the box you have just opened. Select all and Ok. This will open all the custom shapes that Photoshop comes with. The rabbit should be in the selection.

How to create a Clipping Mask

The grass layer has been turned into a clipping mask with the shape of the rabbit below.
The grass layer has been turned into a clipping mask with the shape of the rabbit below.

Keep only one shape layer and delete all the others.

Place an image in the workspace: File>Place. Make sure the image is larger in size than the shape on the layer below. Right-click on your image layer and select Create Clipping Mask.

Male sure that you do this to your image layer and that the image layer is on top!!!

Your image layer has been reduced to the shape of the shape layer below. 🙂

  • Try to move just the image by selecting the image layer.
  • Try to move just the shape layer.

What is the difference?

How to use the Gaussian Blur

Make sure your shape thumbnail on your shape layer is selected. Go to the menu bar: Filter>Blur>Gaussian Blur and enter 7.4px for the Radius.

You should be prompted if you want to rasterize the layer. Click yes.

How to merge two Layers

Select two layers (left click + Ctrl) then right click and select Merge Layers.

How to flatten an Image

Right click on any layer and select Flatten Image or press Ctrl+Shift+E (Cmd+Shft+E on Mac)

Tasks

This completes today’s tutorials, please perform the below tasks:

Task 1 – Start a new document – 700x500px at 150ppi (pixels/inch) resolution and background contents set to transparent. Create a clipping mask with a rounded rectangle (fill most of the document space and with a 40px radius) of a photo of geese in Ameland, inthe Netherlands by Frans Schouwenburg. The photo is available under Creative Commons agreement and can be found on Flickr.com. Create a Gaussian blur (7.4px) of the clipping mask and flatten the image. Save as a JPEG with this title: Class3_T1_Your_full_name.jpg (example: Class3_T1_Toni_Varsetti.jpg). Upload the file to MyKangan and keep a copy of the JPEG.

Actually – in class we ended up straying and did the grassy rabbit instead. I am happy with either. See image:

Grassy Rabbits

Grassy Rabbits

Task 2 – Use the same document from task 1 or start a new document – 700x500px at 150ppi (pixels/inch) resolution and background contents set to transparent. Type the initials of your name in Impact Regular 200pt. If you have not done so in task 1, download the image of the geese in Ameland (see Task 1 for link). Place the file in your document (File>Place). When excepting the size make sure that the image is larger than the initials. Finally create a clipping mask (the photos should only appear inside the text now). Save the file as a PNG with this title: Class3_T2_Your_full_name.png (example: Class3_T2_Toni_Varsetti.png). Upload the file to MyKangan and keep a copy of the PNG.

Example:

Initials

Initials

Here is a link to a Clipping Mask tutorial on SalinStudio.com

Student Submissions:

Yong - Clipping Mask
Yong – Clipping Mask
Justin Clipping Mask
Justin Clipping Mask