The Design Process

The design process can also be referred to as design methodology. It basically refers to a number of steps that a design can be broken down to from the initial idea or client request to the final printed end piece or manufactured prototype.

There are several trends to create a streamlined step-by-step approach, but it is not chiseled in stone. You can look at my preferred method and modify it for your needs.

I have based mine on my practice, research and education and it is working well for me. A great source of inspiration was the Double Diamond or the 4Ds developed by the British Design Council. The 4Ds stand for discover, define, develop and deliver.

The design process below is particularly suitable to communication design, but works for other design disciplines as well.

Here are the 7 steps:

  1. Project Analysis or Project Considerations
  2. Research
  3. Design Strategy
  4. Concept Development with Evaluation
  5. Concept Refinement with Evaluation
  6. Prototyping or Modelmaking
  7. Delivery and Completion
Design Process broken down into 7 steps by Federico Viola

The Design Process – in 7 steps – by educator Federico Viola

  1. Project Analysis or Project Considerations

The first step is to define the problem or the request for a design. Either you are approached by a client or alternatively you may get your hands on a brief through a competition or by your teacher.

  • Your first step has to be to analyse what the client needs and define a written brief. So, you need to write a short description that lists, what is required, what materials are needed, who it is for and by when it is needed. So, list the problem and what you need to design as well as dead lines or due dates.
  • Next you need to create a project plan or action plan. This is a list of each task, with a task description, allocation (who will do the task), due date and a tick box. The allocation column is not necessary if you work on your own and complete all the tasks on by yourself.
  • You should also include a section on potential problems in this project. This could be a mind map and it should allow you to see any complications early. An example could be the stability of a desk based yearly calendar, or the wear and tear of an exterior.
  1. Research

 The research stage is your attempt to learn about the design that you are about to create. You want to research these 3 stages as a minimum: competitors, target audience (or target market) and design and technology.

Competitor Research

After establishing what product (or service) you are designing for your client, find 3 or more competitors that offer the same or a similar product or service. It is good to look at a market leader as well as competitors at a similar level to your client. This can start of as a brain storm of all competitors that come to your mind or a search of similar businesses online. You may want to find competitors via an online business directory, e.g.: www.truelocal.com.au or by using Google. If you are not aware of many online business directories try a Google search for ‘business directory’.

You can document your brainstorm in form of a mind map and your research in form of a page including:

  • short description of the competitor
  • images of their products
  • logo of the competitor or product
  • other aspects of their visual identity (e.g.:colours, fonts, etc.)
Photo of a family by alexander41 found on morgueFile.com

Who is your target audience? – Source: morgueFile – photographer: alexander41

Target Audience Research

When you are setting out to understand and define a target audience you are looking to recognise why this group or individual person is seeking out your client’s product or services. By understanding a target audience you understand their needs, desires and interests in a particular product. This is central in designing a product or service. We are trying to understand a target audience by looking at data of that group. These are typical criteria to collect data by:

  • demographic (measurable data: age, income, gender, culture, language)
  • psychographic (personality-related data: life style choices, hobbies, interests, political agenda, cultural traits)
  • customer needs
  • customer desires
  • frequency of use
  • geographic location

Below you will be introduced to different tools you can use to collect data:

  • mind mapping – a good starting point, mind map the various aspects of the target audience
  • target audience list – filling in a list of criteria related to the target audience
  • moodboard or visual board – this is fun: put everything related on a sheet of paper or into a digital presentation
  • character profile – this needs to be representative of a typical person in the target audience, preferably a common personality or a leader, see examples below

Finding information about a target audience might mean to actually listen in on your target audience. You can create specific discussion groups with participants of the correct demographic (age, gender, etc.) and psychographic (interests, political persuasion, etc.) profile. You can search online for chat forums or in the comments to related blogs and Facebook is a powerful resource as well.

Example of a character profile

Example of a character profile – developed for class.

Character Profile - The Librarian

Character Profile – The Librarian – FViola

Design and Technology Research

Design research is the fun part of our research and is where we want to look at inspiration for our design. This can be

  • existing products of the type we are about to design as well as
  • layouts
  • typefaces (fonts) > http://www.dafont.com
  • colours suitable to the target audience, product and client business
  • textures
  • shapes

The technology aspect relates to manufacturing, finishing or prototyping methods used for the product you are designing. It is central to understand the process and materials applied in the making of the product. If you are working on a plastic component to be inserted into a dashboard of a car or yacht you may need to research the plastic manufacturing process (e.g.: injection molding). While if you are designing a pamphlet, you will need to research printing and folding techniques. So ensure to research:

  • manufacturing and other technology
  • materials
  • other aspects

I like to use Pinterest in my research and highly recommend it as it is a fun site.

Screenshot of Pinterest site showing a Pinterest board of poster designs

Pinterest Screenshot

  1. Design Strategy

A design strategy is a written statement that will help you establish what you are setting out to design. It is your chance to reflect on your analysis and research and now clearly state what your intended design strategy will be. Make sure to relate your strategy to your design ideas and link it to your research and brief.

Example: ‘I will set out to design a poster for the MUFF (Melbourne Underground Film Festival). I will use vector graphics to show a group of festival goers waiting in a lobby. They will all look eclectic and wear some retro-style clothes. The font needs to work with the MUFF logo. The poster will have a retro appeal, but look contemporary. I want to avoid designing a poster that looks dated. The layout will have a clear visual hierarchy and good use of white space. The colour scheme needs to be decided.’

You see that the design strategy is a method to plan your design, but needs to link your ideas to the brief and research. Your design strategy may be a work in progress and you may not conclude every aspect. It is a bit a cooking recipe for a design. Incorporate problems or difficulties with this project as you may have found in your Project Analysis.

  1. Concept Development

Now you can get creative by developing concepts or ideas. The preferred method is the sketching of thumbnails on paper. Use pencils or fine liners to sketch out your concepts. You need to create a large number of ideas. Do not limit yourself to only your first few ideas, but use brainstorming, mind mapping and other creative thinking tools to come up with creative and unorthodox concepts. I would develop a minimum of 30 thumbnail sketches.

Poster concept sketches developed for an event poster.

Poster concept sketches by S.Lau

  1. Concept Refinement with Evaluation

Select 3 of the most suitable and promising concepts. You may select them yourself or get the feedback of a colleague or the client. Refine the concepts by exploring variations for layout, fonts, scale, colours and shades, as well as image choices and finishes. Always include a colour scheme (options of colours) and font choices.

  • Depending on the product you may create 3 mockups to give a feel for the product.
  • Present your 3 refined concepts to your design team and client for evaluation and feedback. Choose the preferred concept.
  • You may create a style guide that clearly defines the different aspects of this design (font choices for headers, base text, colour choices, and more)

The evaluation takes your design strategy into account and looks at how well each design has achieved the desired aspects.

  1. Prototype or Modelmaking

Create a to-scale prototype in the correct finish and finalise your design.

  1. Completion

Finalise all the paperwork and files. Support your client and other third party companies with the correct information, files and support.

  • Ensure the manufacturer or printer is completing the job (e.g.: by signing off a test print)
  • Save all files into correct folders. Store the files.
  • Finalise all invoicing and payments.
  • Supply your client with all the correct files and instructions.
  • Write a completion report

Other Useful Resources

Quicksprout’s How To Define Your Target Audience

The 7 Steps of a Professional Design Process by DesignCrowd

Inspirationfeed’s 7 Design Process Steps Designers Should Follow

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C1 – Design Simple Webpage Layouts – Week 08

Banner_Cert IV WebBTech-designSimpleWebsite

Link to all Weeks     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6      Week 7    Link to this Unit on MyKangan

Today’s Class

  • Assessment – Website
    • Step 4 – Create the Website
  • Dreamweaver
  • Feedback

Assessment Website

Step 4 – Create the Website

Create the website in Dreamweaver (or any other Code editor) using HTML, CSS and if necessary JavaScript or JQuery.

  • Your website needs to have a well-designed layout.
  • 4 Web Pages:
    1. Home Page
    2. About us and Contact
    3. Gallery or Portfolio of Work
    4. Bookings or Purchase Requests

Dreamweaver

We will continue using divs (Read up on Divs on W3School) and complete a website in class.

Attend class to learn about how to set up your website in Dreamweaver. You will learn how to create divs, place images, create an interactive menu and more.

How to create an interactive menu:

Feedback

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Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 6

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com
Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Complete a Tutorial
  2. Lines in Photoshop
  3. Feedback

Complete a Tutorial

Select a tutorial from below, complete it, add meta-data to the PSD file. Save as a JPEG and email a copy to me(with all relevant meta-data).

Lines in Photoshop

As we saw last week working with lines can be a lot of fun and create very dynamic results. Photoshop has many interesting options on using lines. Particularly the many effects that are part of Photoshop can lead to stunning results.

Windows Vista Aurora Effect – a good and reasonably easy to follow tutorial by a favourite site of mine: Tutorial9.

Vista Lighting Effect - Courtesy of: Tutorial9

Vista Lighting Effect – Courtesy of: Tutorial9

Luminescent Lines – this tutorial from a great Photoshop tutorial site – PSD Learning – looks at customising brush dynamics. Fun to do and an interesting start: use a photo to create a suprisingly abstract and attractive background. A good tutorial to try on your own.

Luminescent Lines - Courtesy of: PSDLearning

Luminescent Lines – Courtesy of: PSDLearning

Gentle Curves of Pure Light – follow the tutorial from PhotoshopEssentials in class to create gentle curves with the pen tool and turn them into bright light.

Light Streaks - Courtesy of: PhotoshopEssentials

Light Streaks – Courtesy of: PhotoshopEssentials

Abstract Background – this is a more basic tutorial from YourPhotoshopGuide. It is good to introduce the Lens Flare filter and makes good use of the Free Transform and copy layer options.

Luminescent Twirls- Courtesy of: YourPhotoshopGuide

Luminescent Twirls- Courtesy of: YourPhotoshopGuide

Wavy Blackberry Style Wallpaper – this is a great tutorial from psdtuts+. It consists of 16 steps, but the result is convincing and you will learn a few good techniques on how to work with gradients and how to add depth to your work.

Lines and Gradients- Courtesy of: psdtuts+

Lines and Gradients- Courtesy of: psdtuts+

Lines Tutorial – follow the in-class instructions to create an image like the one below. I basically used the Brush tool and drew straight lines. Next I multiplied layers (Ctrl+J) and changed the layer blending mode.

I added a photo, in the example a photo of Grace Kelly and masked selections.

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Other links with many excellent tutorials:

40 Cool Abstract and Background Photoshop Tutorials – by Hongkiat Lim

25 Useful Photoshop Background Tutorials | Vandelay Design Blog

Feedback

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C1 – Design Simple Webpage Layouts – Week 07

Banner_Cert IV WebBTech-designSimpleWebsite

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6      Link to this Unit on MyKangan

Today’s Class

  • Assessment – Website
    • Four Web Pages
    • Step 1 Brainstorm Ideas
    • Step 2 Research Content
    • Step 3 Storyboard
    • Step 4 – Create the Website
  • Design and Layout
    • Guide to Good Web Design
  • Dreamweaver
  • Feedback

Assessment Website

Today we will commence on your assessment for this class. You will need to design a website for a client to promote his work or services. See examples below as a result of an in-class brain storm:

  • Portfolio of a designer, web-designer, graphic designer, fashion designer, …
  • Portfolio of an artist or illustrator
  • Portfolio of a photographer
  • Website for a horse trainer
  • Website for a singer
  • Website for a humanitarian organisation, eg Doctors Without Borders
  • Website for a restaurant

Four Web Pages

You will need to create 4 web pages using Dreamweaver or a WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get) code editor. These are the pages for you to create:

  1. Home Page
  2. About us and Contact
  3. Gallery or Portfolio of Work
  4. Bookings or Purchase Requests

Step 1 – Brainstorm Ideas

Brainstorm ideas for a website (if portfolio for a photographer, what type of photographer, wedding, portrait, famous photographer, …)

Step 2 – Research Content

Go online and research what content you can find for your website. Use Creative Commons sites whenever possible:

Otherwise use Google and add Creative Commons to your search criteria.

Step 3 – Storyboard

Create a storyboard for the website. Before you can create the storyboard you will need to organise all the different elements. Please refer to the Storyboard Workshop from Tuesday:

Storyboarding for Web Designers

Webdesigners benefit from storyboarding. It helps organising content and ensures that every element is included in a logical place according to topic and site.

Read the post on Storyboarding Your Website (Source: nmasse.com).

Storyboard Template

You can use the template below (a modified version of one found on Google Docs Public Templates) :

Storyboard Template

Step 4 – Create the Website

Create the website in Dreamweaver (or any other Code editor) using HTML, CSS and if necessary JavaScript or JQuery.

Your website needs to have a well-designed layout

Attend class to learn about how to set up your website in Dreamweaver. You will learn how to create divs, place images, create an interactive menu and more.

Design and Layout

Here are some important standards to consider for a convincing, well-communicated web page:

  • Clarity is vital (Link to post on IWantClarity.com)
  • Less items on page – make sure to use white space excessively
  • Design should guide the user to information

Please view the PowerPoint show by Sara Ryan on Vic Costello’s ‘Multimedia Foundations –
Core Concepts for Digital Design’: Multimedia Foundations

White Space in Web Design - Courtesy of: unmatchedstyle.com

White Space in Web Design – Courtesy of: unmatchedstyle.com

White Space in Web Design - Courtesy of: OXP - onextrapixel.com

White Space in Web Design – Courtesy of: OXP – onextrapixel.com

Guide to Good Web Design

  • Use Design to guide user’s eye to the information.
  • Keep the layout simple and uncluttered.
  • Use consistent navigation bar throughout the site.
  • Organize text material in clearly defined groups.
  • Be consistent, clear and concise.
  • Stick to standards used on web (Accessibility)
  • Do not include essential information on roll-over images.
  • Include a contact option for the user, this could be:
    • A Help Desk Number to a live person.
    • A context sensitive ‘HELP’ button.
    • An e-mail ‘Ask a Photographer’ or ‘Ask an Accountant’ or ‘Ask an Expert’  option.

Dreamweaver

Today you will learn how to create divs and add colour to them.

Feedback

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Workshop 1 – Create Storyboards

Today’s Class

  • Introduction
  • Storyboarding for Multimedia
  • Day 1 Task
  • Storyboarding for Webdesigners
  • Storyboard Templates
  • Assessment Task
  • Feedback

Introduction

This workshop is about creating storyboards. A storyboard is a number of drawings, descriptions and annotations that help organising a story visually.

A storyboard is helpful in establishing a number of steps within a story. It will support you in organising the elements and give your story a clear focus.

Storyboards are used in a number of fields and industries:

  • film and TV
  • animation
  • choreography
  • theatre
  • dance
  • opera
  • web design
  • game design
  • writing
  • other multimedia fields

Storyboarding a film is quite different from storyboarding a website.

Storyboards can be created using software or it can be created with pen and paper.

Pen and Paper

When you create a storyboard on paper I recommend to use colours and plenty of annotations.

Example of a storyboard with annotations. Courtesy of Sarah Pritchard.

Example of a storyboard with annotations. Courtesy of Sarah Pritchard.

Software

Most software packages will allow you to create storyboards:

  • Adobe Photoshop
  • Adobe Illustrator
  • Corel Draw
  • MS Word
  • MS PowerPoint

There are also some specialised software packages for creating storyboards:

  • StoryBoard Artist Studio
  • StoryBoard Pro
  • Inspiration

There are also numerous websites that allow you to create storyboards:

Storyboarding for Multimedia

Please follow the link below and read How to Do a Rough Storyboard by Jane Stevens.

After reading the post please complete the task below.

Day 1 Task

Please open the file and complete in class: Day 1 Task – Create Storyboard

Storyboarding for Webdesigners

Webdesigners benefit from storyboarding. It helps organising content and ensures that every element is included in a logical place according to topic and site.

Read the post on Storyboarding Your Website (Source: nmasse.com).

Storyboard Templates

Below are a number of links for storyboard templates:

Search Google Docs for Templates

Storyboard Template

Storyboard template (Courtesy of http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu )

Assessment Task

The assessment task will be included in (clustered with)  C1 – Design Simple Website Layouts.

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

E-Learning and Games – Week 4

Based on photo by xandert found on morgueFile

Based on photo by xandert found on morgueFile

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Game Mechanics
  2. Brainstorm Game Mechanics
  3. Assessment 2
  4. Feedback

Game Mechanics

Jenga, photo courtesy of: Design-Crit.com

Jenga, photo courtesy of: Design-Crit.com

Game mechanics are at the core of a game and decisive for game play. Good engaging game mechanics will make a game fun to play  or challenging and as well rewarding.

Game mechanics can be found in board games (Chess, Backgammon, Jenga) and for board games we often refer to core mechanics. Examples are:

  • Role Playing (Charades)
  • Capture & Eliminate (Chess)
  • Pattern Recognition (Chess, Rush Hour)
  • Memory (Memory)
  • Dice Rolling (Monop0ly)
  • Find the extensive list below at: BoardGameGeek.com
Acting

Action / Movement Programming

Action Point Allowance System

Area Control / Area Influence

Area Enclosure

Area Movement

Area-Impulse

Auction/Bidding

Betting/Wagering

Campaign / Battle Card Driven

Card Drafting

Chit-Pull System

Co-operative Play

Commodity Speculation

Crayon Rail System

Deck / Pool Building

Dice Rolling

Grid Movement

Hand Management

Hex-and-Counter

Line Drawing

Memory

Modular Board

Paper-and-Pencil

Partnerships

Pattern Building

Pattern Recognition

Pick-up and Deliver

Player Elimination

Point to Point Movement

Press Your Luck

Rock-Paper-Scissors

Role Playing

Roll / Spin and Move

Route/Network Building

Secret Unit Deployment

Set Collection

Simulation

Simultaneous Action Selection

Singing

Stock Holding

Storytelling

Take That

Tile Placement

Time Track

Trading

Trick-taking

Variable Phase Order

Variable Player Powers

Voting

Worker Placement

Videogames use game mechanics as well, but besides the core mechanics they are more related to aspect of digital technology.

Find an extensive list of game mechanics at Wikipedia.

We can and should list game mechanics to be able to select what game mechanics we like, but at the end of the day we need to be able to apply game mechanics to a game. This need to happen in the context of the game’s overall purpose. We will read this post: Game Mechanics and Gamification by Andrzej Marczewski on Gamasutra together to get a better idea about how to apply game mechanics.

Brainstorm Game Mechanics

We will do a brainstorm in class for potential game mechanics for the ABC learning game for children (assessment).

Look at this list of Motivators and Supporters (as found on Gamasutra’s post Game Mechanics and Gamification – link is above):

Motivators Possible Supporters
Autonomy Customisation Choice Freedom
Mastery Levels Challenges
Purpose Giving / Altruism Narrative Greater Meaning
Status Leaderboards Achievements
Social Connections Suggest similar users Cooperative “play”
Rewards Points Badges Achievements
Peer Pressure Peer review / feedback / grading systems Boasting   / Bragging system Competitive “play”
Avoidance Lose Points Lose Status Game Over
Scarcity Exclusive / Unique Rewards Reward Schedules
Fun! Real Games Quiz’s Competitions
Screenshot of Writing Wizard, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Screenshot of Writing Wizard, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Screenshot of Endless Alphabet 2, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Screenshot of Endless Alphabet 2, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Use 3 motivators from the list above and brainstorm game mechanics for the e-game for your assignment (prep-children recognising letters of the alphabet).

List the factors:

  • Desired Behaviour (eg blow away sand to reveal a letter – find the same letter in a list of letters and click on it)
  • Motivation (Mastery: Learning the letters of the alphabet; Status: receiving a badge, star, completing a level)
  • Supporters (for mastery: being able to read; for status: having your score displayed, completing a series – eg a series of green frogs)

Assessment 2

Assessment 2 – E-Game

Feedback

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Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 5

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com
Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Lines
  2. Lines in Design
  3. Feedback

Lines

Warm-up

We will look at lines today with fresh eyes (I hope). Line can be defined as having a starting point and an end point and the connection between the two is what the line actually is.

Lines are quite an amazing tool for many creators: when drawing the caricaturist uses lines to create his mean contortions to display a fatter, bolder, thinner, long nosed, big mouthed version of his subject. A writer uses lines to create text filled with meaning.

A graph shows the changes in the economy and an arrow points at something.

Lines can be a powerful tool of expression and we will start today’s class with a blank sheet of paper and a pencil.

Draw 5 lines to express 5 concepts, themes or emotions. Below are examples:

  • forgetfulness
  • playfulness
  • sadness
  • happiness
  • searching
  • excited
  • technology
  • nature
  • anything that you come up with …

About Lines

What is a line?

A line is a fundamental design and art element. We describe the world around us with line drawings. We draw the contour or outline of objects and shapes that we see around us to define them on a sheet of paper, a canvas or other 2D platform. This was already established by our forefathers who used the walls of caves as their canvas to depict the world around them.

Work by Egon Schiele, found at Mom.org
Work by Egon Schiele, found at Mom.org

The illustration is by Viennese artist Egon Schiele (pronounced: Sheelah) and you notice how lines are used to display the outlines and expression of a man. The lines do not exist as such in life, a person does not have a contour line around them and their eyes are not two curved lines either.

So, lines are used as a form of expression. Lines are borrowed in drawings to create shapes and outlines.

The function of a line in design (and art) goes beyond that though.

First and foremost in an abstract sense a line is something that we perceive more than view. It gives us a sense of direction. In this sense lines seem to always have one or more directions.

The swirls in the image are made up of numerous lines. Courtesy of: www.openprocessing.org
The swirls in the image are made up of numerous lines. Courtesy of: http://www.openprocessing.org

The lines in the image above seem to move from left to right if you are of a culture that reads from left to right.

Characteristics

Lines can be looked at by characteristics:

  • Length
  • Weight (darkness/thickness)
  • Direction

Basic Applications

Lines can be looked at by their basic application:

  • Outline describes the outer boundary of a two-dimensional shape.
  • Contour is the use of line to define the edge of an object and emphasize the volume or mass of the form.
  • Gestural lines are quick marks that capture the impression of a pose or movement.
  • Implied lines are suggested or broken lines that are completed with your imagination through the concept of closure. An arrow is used to suggest a direction or path for the eye to follow.
  • Calligraphy is beautiful, expressive marks. An expressive stroke freely uses the characteristics of line to convey emotion to the viewer, much like an individual’s handwriting changes with different moods.
  • Analytical line is a formal use of line. Analytical line is closer to geometry with its use of precise and controlled marks. A grid is a very popular analytical use of visual line as a way to organize a design. The Golden Section is an example of the traditional use of analytical classical line, which uses calculated implied lines to bring unity to the structure of a painting composition.
  • Modeling line is used to create the illusion of volume in drawing. Hatching is the use of parallel lines to suggest value change. Parallel lines on another angle can be added to create cross-hatching to build up a gradation and more value in areas of a drawing.
  • Directional lines suggest movement or a path of vision and have specific connotations associated with them for example: Vertical lines suggest power and authority; horizontal lines suggest peace and tranquility. Together they give a feeling of calm and stability. Diagonal lines suggest tension; curved lines are graceful and fluid. Together they create a feeling of stress and movement.
    Linear perspective can be applied to drawing to create the illusion of depth on a two-dimensional surface.  (Source: http://www.onlineartcenter.com/line.html)

Lines in Design

Look at the example below of lines in design from a Google search:

Lines Google Image Search
Lines Google Image Search

Click on the image above and save 5 -10 images to inspire you to create a Photoshop generated image that displays lines as a rhythmic component.

Before you save the file and email it to me, make sure to include the Meta Data.

Below is an example of a Photoshop generated study incorporating a portrait of the US-American actress Grace Kelly (image can be found at: GettingCheeky) with straight lines at different angles and a wallpaper found on FreeFever.com.

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

C1 – Design Simple Webpage Layouts – Week 06

Banner_Cert IV WebBTech-designSimpleWebsite

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6      Link to this Unit on MyKangan

Today’s Class

  • Dreamweaver – Session 4
  • Feedback
Part of a table created in Dreamweaver. The colour is Olive.

Part of a table created in Dreamweaver. The colour is Olive.

Dreamweaver – Session 4

We will commence today’s Dreamweaver session by looking at the same content from Tuesday’s class.

Please open Dreamweaver and then transfer the content from the links below (Tables):

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Manage Quality Customer Service – Class 5

Link to all Classes     Class 1    Class 2     Class 3     Class 4     Class 5

Today’s Class

  • Assignment 2 – Customer Service
  • Feedback

Assignment 2 – Customer Service

Today I will give out the final assessment task for customer service. Please read How to handle customer complaints – TrainingMag and participate in the class activity.

Afterwards complete the assessment below:

Assessment 2 Customer Service.

Feedback

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E-Learning and Games – Week 3

Based on photo by xandert found on morgueFile

Based on photo by xandert found on morgueFile

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Content:

  1. Learning Needs
  2. Learning Styles
  3. Assessment 1
  4. Feedback

Learning Needs

Learning needs are the requirements that the learner needs to learn to pass a subject or to move to the next step.

So, a learning needs analysis is conducted to recognise the gap between the existing skills, knowledge and abilities and those that are needed for the level of education. Once this gap is determined, decisions can be taken as to the type of training required (if this is the preferred action) and the form of delivery.

By conducting a learning needs analysis, you can identify what features are needed in your e-learning game.

Write down the learning needs of your target audience? Start this point of with the desired outcome: what does the learner need to learn?

This is a good point to brainstorm. What is it that you need to expose your learner to?

Read more about Learning Needs at AssetProject.info.

Learning Styles

Every learner has a preferred style of learning. The majority of learners prefer a mix of learning styles.

Look up the link Learning Styles Online and discover which learning style is your preferred one.

Assessment 1

E-Learning Conceptual Layout of Screen: www.emedicus.co.uk

E-Learning Conceptual Layout of Screen: http://www.emedicus.co.uk

Assessment 1 – Research

Feedback

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