C1 – Design Simple Webpage Layouts – Week 08

Banner_Cert IV WebBTech-designSimpleWebsite

Link to all Weeks     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6      Week 7    Link to this Unit on MyKangan

Today’s Class

  • Assessment – Website
    • Step 4 – Create the Website
  • Dreamweaver
  • Feedback

Assessment Website

Step 4 – Create the Website

Create the website in Dreamweaver (or any other Code editor) using HTML, CSS and if necessary JavaScript or JQuery.

  • Your website needs to have a well-designed layout.
  • 4 Web Pages:
    1. Home Page
    2. About us and Contact
    3. Gallery or Portfolio of Work
    4. Bookings or Purchase Requests

Dreamweaver

We will continue using divs (Read up on Divs on W3School) and complete a website in class.

Attend class to learn about how to set up your website in Dreamweaver. You will learn how to create divs, place images, create an interactive menu and more.

How to create an interactive menu:

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

C3 – CSS and Testing Procedures – Week 06

Today’s Class – Web Security Workshop

  • Ensure Basic Website Security
  • Research These Terms
    • Upload the Complete File on MyKangan
  • Internet Security
    • Protect Fixed Internet Connection and IP Address
    • Use and Maintain Antivirus Software
    • Protect Shared Network Resources From Intrusion
    • Following Security Protocols
    • Disable Control Protocol
    • NETBIOS and TCP/IP
  • Assessment Task
  • Feedback

Ensure Basic Website Security

Today we will have to insert a workshop on basic Website security.

This is the unit of competency that we will cover:

Read the units’ elements:

  • Determine Business Security Requirements
  • Ensure Web Server Security
  • Ensure Protocol Security

Research These Terms

Use this link TechTerms.com, Webopedia.com and find your own web dictionary to research the terms below:

  • What is a (Web) Host/(Web) Hosting?
  • What does ISP stand for?
  • Example of 2 free hosting services (provide links)
  • What is FTP?
  • What is a Domain name?
  • Explain IP Address and give an example!
  • What is the difference between a static and a dynamic IP address?
  • Find and list prices for a domain name made up of your name on http://who.is/
  • What is the difference between a server and a PC?
  • What is a Web Server?
  • What is a Gateway?
  • Give an example for a Gateway.
  • What is the purpose of a Firewall and where is it located?
  • What is meant by Malware?
  • Give 3 examples for Malware!
  • How can you protect your computer against Malware?
    Give three examples of software designed to protect your computer!
  • Define HTTP.
  • Define HTTPS. How does it differ from HTTP?
  • What is a URL?
  • Define SSL.
  • Explain the acronym TCP! How does it relate to IP?

Upload the Complete File on MyKangan

Create a new Word Document and insert all your definitions in there with the source of your information. Next upload this as a Day 1 Task on MyKangan in ICAWEB408A-Ensure Basic Website Security.

Visual Example of a Network

Visual Example of a Network connected to the Internet: Example of the Internet displayed as networks.

Example of a Network with Routers , Servers, Host PCs - Courtesy of: The TPC/IP Guide

Example of a Network with Routers , Servers, Host PCs – Courtesy of: The TPC/IP Guide (click on image for link)

You can view the different routers that your host PC will visit when accessing a Web page:

Launch the command prompt from a Windows-based computer click: Start > All Programs > Accessories
> Command Prompt. Type tracert and hit enter. This process is called tracing route to a website.

tracert command

tracert command

Internet Security

I would like to thank Anonymous alias JB for the most of the documentation below.

Read all the information below to be able to complete your assessment task for this unit.

Protect Fixed Internet Connection and IP Address

The IP address is always visible to the outside world. Internally, you can reduce its visibility for non-technical persons but not eliminate knowledge of the address.

  • Security updates on server/gateway.

Security exploitation is commonplace today and so it is essential that security patches for gateway machines are kept current.

  • Only gateway devices should have public IP addresses, not internal network computers, which should be on a private network address scheme.

Use and Maintain Antivirus Software

It is paramount to not just have Antivirus software installed, but to maintain currency .

Read: Internet Security GCF Learn Free

Protect Shared Network Resources From Intrusion

Sharing is the primary productivity benefit of networking. We have to share resources on the network such as printers and file folders in order to be productive. Some of those resources might be shared outside the local network (eg the incoming mail server) but most local network files and hardware are not meant for use outside the organisation and need to be protected. This may also include computerised machine tools used in manufacture and the building air-conditioning and lighting which may be computer controlled.

TCP/IP is the modern network topology. A key feature of the protocol is that different types of traffic (eg Email, web, telephone) are sent to different ‘ports’. There are 65535 Ports available of which the first 1024 are reserved. Of these 1024 reserved ports, only the first 256 are in common use. That means there are tens of thousands of potential gateways into your network that are not in active use. From a security point of view, these open ports are like open doors to a building, with one important difference. Although they are open, there may not be anything on the other side of the door (an empty room). However, Trojans exploit these ports for communication and open ports are a leading cause of the spread of DDOS and other security threats. The primary function provided by all Firewall services is to control the range of open ports. Only those ports intended to be available for use should be open on the firewall. (Note: KANGAN does not seem to apply this restriction.)

  • Firewall

It is necessary to protect the interface between the local network and the internet by the use of a Firewall.  A Firewall will allow management of what links (protocols/ports) are available between the local network and the internet. For example, it would be possible to only allow Email traffic.

A Firewall may either be software running on the gateway or most likely today an Appliance that sits between the Gateway and the Internet. The advantage of an Appliance is that it is purpose built for managing security risks.

  • Password Strength

Weak passwords are the single most common cause of security failure.

Read: Passwords: The First Step to Safety GCF Learn Free

Following Security Protocols

Ensure that personal computer protocols and preferences follow security protocols. (Too many uses of the word protocol here and with different nuances of meaning).

  • As the risk of an unexpected new threat is always there, it is essential that there are rules for how information about the internal network is managed. These include, establishing minimum password lengths and types, where business files are saved and how or if visitors are allowed any computer access.
  • Ensure that all staff understand security issues and in particular the role of HTTPS in creating secure data links; how to handle suspicious email and what to do if they suspect their computer is infected by a virus or otherwise compromised.
  • Ensure that processes exist to install and maintain Antivirus on all workstations.
  • Induction program for new staff on computer security and use procedures.

Disable Control Protocol

Disable control protocol or internet protocol bindings for file and printer sharing. (This is not relevant to modern Windows releases which implement security over file and printer access on the TCP/IP network.)

  • When a computer is directly connected to the internet, (e.g. at Home) shared printers and shared files are exposed to the internet and this can be exploited, particularly if passwords on the files/printers do not exist or are weak. At home, disabling file and printer sharing would prevent sharing of things such as iTunes on the local network. The better strategy is to make sure you have very strong passwords on the printer and file shares.
  • Do not disable or uninstall File and Printer sharing on a Business network. Disabling this will mean that the network cannot operate effectively in sharing data and services, which is its main purpose. In commercial environments (e.g. Kangan), TCP/IP is usually the only network protocol in use and the gateway server/appliance is the first level of defence against outside access. Most modern networks store shared files only on the server with robust security measures controlled by the server software.

NETBIOS and TCP/IP

Ensure that network basic input/output system (NETBIOS) over TCP/IP is disabled.

NETBIOS is a network Applications Programming Interface (API) that was used prior to Windows 2000 / XP to identify the individual computers on the network. Essentially it was the means by which data was directed across the network, by applications, to the computer that required it. It is not really a network protocol as such, more like a utility that software can implement to communicate between machines. It is not secure as it was developed in the context that the network was ‘trusted’ and only local (not internet exposed). NETBIOS is easily exploited to gain unauthorised access.

  • NETBIOS exists by default in all Windows releases using TCP/IP, including Windows 8.  NETBIOS should not be implemented on any current systems and must be disabled.
  • You can disable NETBIOS using Group Policy on the Server or by individually disabling under Control Panel/ Local Network Connections / TCP/IP Advanced Settings / WINS

When Windows 2000 / XP first came out, NETBIOS was required to allow for some applications to work across networks that also had Windows98 machines. Those applications and services that depend on NetBIOS over TCP/IP no longer function once NetBIOS over TCP/IP is disabled.

Assessment Task

Please download the assessment task here (on Wednesday) and upload to MyKangan.

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 6

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com
Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Complete a Tutorial
  2. Lines in Photoshop
  3. Feedback

Complete a Tutorial

Select a tutorial from below, complete it, add meta-data to the PSD file. Save as a JPEG and email a copy to me(with all relevant meta-data).

Lines in Photoshop

As we saw last week working with lines can be a lot of fun and create very dynamic results. Photoshop has many interesting options on using lines. Particularly the many effects that are part of Photoshop can lead to stunning results.

Windows Vista Aurora Effect - a good and reasonably easy to follow tutorial by a favourite site of mine: Tutorial9.

Vista Lighting Effect - Courtesy of: Tutorial9

Vista Lighting Effect – Courtesy of: Tutorial9

Luminescent Lines - this tutorial from a great Photoshop tutorial site – PSD Learning – looks at customising brush dynamics. Fun to do and an interesting start: use a photo to create a suprisingly abstract and attractive background. A good tutorial to try on your own.

Luminescent Lines - Courtesy of: PSDLearning

Luminescent Lines – Courtesy of: PSDLearning

Gentle Curves of Pure Light – follow the tutorial from PhotoshopEssentials in class to create gentle curves with the pen tool and turn them into bright light.

Light Streaks - Courtesy of: PhotoshopEssentials

Light Streaks – Courtesy of: PhotoshopEssentials

Abstract Background – this is a more basic tutorial from YourPhotoshopGuide. It is good to introduce the Lens Flare filter and makes good use of the Free Transform and copy layer options.

Luminescent Twirls- Courtesy of: YourPhotoshopGuide

Luminescent Twirls- Courtesy of: YourPhotoshopGuide

Wavy Blackberry Style Wallpaper - this is a great tutorial from psdtuts+. It consists of 16 steps, but the result is convincing and you will learn a few good techniques on how to work with gradients and how to add depth to your work.

Lines and Gradients- Courtesy of: psdtuts+

Lines and Gradients- Courtesy of: psdtuts+

Lines Tutorial – follow the in-class instructions to create an image like the one below. I basically used the Brush tool and drew straight lines. Next I multiplied layers (Ctrl+J) and changed the layer blending mode.

I added a photo, in the example a photo of Grace Kelly and masked selections.

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Other links with many excellent tutorials:

40 Cool Abstract and Background Photoshop Tutorials – by Hongkiat Lim

25 Useful Photoshop Background Tutorials | Vandelay Design Blog

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

C1 – Design Simple Webpage Layouts – Week 07

Banner_Cert IV WebBTech-designSimpleWebsite

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6      Link to this Unit on MyKangan

Today’s Class

  • Assessment – Website
    • Four Web Pages
    • Step 1 Brainstorm Ideas
    • Step 2 Research Content
    • Step 3 Storyboard
    • Step 4 – Create the Website
  • Design and Layout
    • Guide to Good Web Design
  • Dreamweaver
  • Feedback

Assessment Website

Today we will commence on your assessment for this class. You will need to design a website for a client to promote his work or services. See examples below as a result of an in-class brain storm:

  • Portfolio of a designer, web-designer, graphic designer, fashion designer, …
  • Portfolio of an artist or illustrator
  • Portfolio of a photographer
  • Website for a horse trainer
  • Website for a singer
  • Website for a humanitarian organisation, eg Doctors Without Borders
  • Website for a restaurant

Four Web Pages

You will need to create 4 web pages using Dreamweaver or a WYSIWYG (What you see is what you get) code editor. These are the pages for you to create:

  1. Home Page
  2. About us and Contact
  3. Gallery or Portfolio of Work
  4. Bookings or Purchase Requests

Step 1 – Brainstorm Ideas

Brainstorm ideas for a website (if portfolio for a photographer, what type of photographer, wedding, portrait, famous photographer, …)

Step 2 – Research Content

Go online and research what content you can find for your website. Use Creative Commons sites whenever possible:

Otherwise use Google and add Creative Commons to your search criteria.

Step 3 – Storyboard

Create a storyboard for the website. Before you can create the storyboard you will need to organise all the different elements. Please refer to the Storyboard Workshop from Tuesday:

Storyboarding for Web Designers

Webdesigners benefit from storyboarding. It helps organising content and ensures that every element is included in a logical place according to topic and site.

Read the post on Storyboarding Your Website (Source: nmasse.com).

Storyboard Template

You can use the template below (a modified version of one found on Google Docs Public Templates) :

Storyboard Template

Step 4 – Create the Website

Create the website in Dreamweaver (or any other Code editor) using HTML, CSS and if necessary JavaScript or JQuery.

Your website needs to have a well-designed layout

Attend class to learn about how to set up your website in Dreamweaver. You will learn how to create divs, place images, create an interactive menu and more.

Design and Layout

Here are some important standards to consider for a convincing, well-communicated web page:

  • Clarity is vital (Link to post on IWantClarity.com)
  • Less items on page – make sure to use white space excessively
  • Design should guide the user to information

Please view the PowerPoint show by Sara Ryan on Vic Costello’s ‘Multimedia Foundations -
Core Concepts for Digital Design’: Multimedia Foundations

White Space in Web Design - Courtesy of: unmatchedstyle.com

White Space in Web Design – Courtesy of: unmatchedstyle.com

White Space in Web Design - Courtesy of: OXP - onextrapixel.com

White Space in Web Design – Courtesy of: OXP – onextrapixel.com

Guide to Good Web Design

  • Use Design to guide user’s eye to the information.
  • Keep the layout simple and uncluttered.
  • Use consistent navigation bar throughout the site.
  • Organize text material in clearly defined groups.
  • Be consistent, clear and concise.
  • Stick to standards used on web (Accessibility)
  • Do not include essential information on roll-over images.
  • Include a contact option for the user, this could be:
    • A Help Desk Number to a live person.
    • A context sensitive ‘HELP’ button.
    • An e-mail ‘Ask a Photographer’ or ‘Ask an Accountant’ or ‘Ask an Expert’  option.

Dreamweaver

Today you will learn how to create divs and add colour to them.

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Workshop 1 – Create Storyboards

Today’s Class

  • Introduction
  • Storyboarding for Multimedia
  • Day 1 Task
  • Storyboarding for Webdesigners
  • Storyboard Templates
  • Assessment Task
  • Feedback

Introduction

This workshop is about creating storyboards. A storyboard is a number of drawings, descriptions and annotations that help organising a story visually.

A storyboard is helpful in establishing a number of steps within a story. It will support you in organising the elements and give your story a clear focus.

Storyboards are used in a number of fields and industries:

  • film and TV
  • animation
  • choreography
  • theatre
  • dance
  • opera
  • web design
  • game design
  • writing
  • other multimedia fields

Storyboarding a film is quite different from storyboarding a website.

Storyboards can be created using software or it can be created with pen and paper.

Pen and Paper

When you create a storyboard on paper I recommend to use colours and plenty of annotations.

Example of a storyboard with annotations. Courtesy of Sarah Pritchard.

Example of a storyboard with annotations. Courtesy of Sarah Pritchard.

Software

Most software packages will allow you to create storyboards:

  • Adobe Photoshop
  • Adobe Illustrator
  • Corel Draw
  • MS Word
  • MS PowerPoint

There are also some specialised software packages for creating storyboards:

  • StoryBoard Artist Studio
  • StoryBoard Pro
  • Inspiration

There are also numerous websites that allow you to create storyboards:

Storyboarding for Multimedia

Please follow the link below and read How to Do a Rough Storyboard by Jane Stevens.

After reading the post please complete the task below.

Day 1 Task

Please open the file and complete in class: Day 1 Task – Create Storyboard

Storyboarding for Webdesigners

Webdesigners benefit from storyboarding. It helps organising content and ensures that every element is included in a logical place according to topic and site.

Read the post on Storyboarding Your Website (Source: nmasse.com).

Storyboard Templates

Below are a number of links for storyboard templates:

Search Google Docs for Templates

Storyboard Template

Storyboard template (Courtesy of http://www.cwrl.utexas.edu )

Assessment Task

The assessment task will be included in (clustered with)  C1 – Design Simple Website Layouts.

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

E-Learning and Games – Week 4

Based on photo by xandert found on morgueFile

Based on photo by xandert found on morgueFile

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Game Mechanics
  2. Brainstorm Game Mechanics
  3. Assessment 2
  4. Feedback

Game Mechanics

Jenga, photo courtesy of: Design-Crit.com

Jenga, photo courtesy of: Design-Crit.com

Game mechanics are at the core of a game and decisive for game play. Good engaging game mechanics will make a game fun to play  or challenging and as well rewarding.

Game mechanics can be found in board games (Chess, Backgammon, Jenga) and for board games we often refer to core mechanics. Examples are:

  • Role Playing (Charades)
  • Capture & Eliminate (Chess)
  • Pattern Recognition (Chess, Rush Hour)
  • Memory (Memory)
  • Dice Rolling (Monop0ly)
  • Find the extensive list below at: BoardGameGeek.com
Acting

Action / Movement Programming

Action Point Allowance System

Area Control / Area Influence

Area Enclosure

Area Movement

Area-Impulse

Auction/Bidding

Betting/Wagering

Campaign / Battle Card Driven

Card Drafting

Chit-Pull System

Co-operative Play

Commodity Speculation

Crayon Rail System

Deck / Pool Building

Dice Rolling

Grid Movement

Hand Management

Hex-and-Counter

Line Drawing

Memory

Modular Board

Paper-and-Pencil

Partnerships

Pattern Building

Pattern Recognition

Pick-up and Deliver

Player Elimination

Point to Point Movement

Press Your Luck

Rock-Paper-Scissors

Role Playing

Roll / Spin and Move

Route/Network Building

Secret Unit Deployment

Set Collection

Simulation

Simultaneous Action Selection

Singing

Stock Holding

Storytelling

Take That

Tile Placement

Time Track

Trading

Trick-taking

Variable Phase Order

Variable Player Powers

Voting

Worker Placement

Videogames use game mechanics as well, but besides the core mechanics they are more related to aspect of digital technology.

Find an extensive list of game mechanics at Wikipedia.

We can and should list game mechanics to be able to select what game mechanics we like, but at the end of the day we need to be able to apply game mechanics to a game. This need to happen in the context of the game’s overall purpose. We will read this post: Game Mechanics and Gamification by Andrzej Marczewski on Gamasutra together to get a better idea about how to apply game mechanics.

Brainstorm Game Mechanics

We will do a brainstorm in class for potential game mechanics for the ABC learning game for children (assessment).

Look at this list of Motivators and Supporters (as found on Gamasutra’s post Game Mechanics and Gamification – link is above):

Motivators Possible Supporters
Autonomy Customisation Choice Freedom
Mastery Levels Challenges
Purpose Giving / Altruism Narrative Greater Meaning
Status Leaderboards Achievements
Social Connections Suggest similar users Cooperative “play”
Rewards Points Badges Achievements
Peer Pressure Peer review / feedback / grading systems Boasting   / Bragging system Competitive “play”
Avoidance Lose Points Lose Status Game Over
Scarcity Exclusive / Unique Rewards Reward Schedules
Fun! Real Games Quiz’s Competitions
Screenshot of Writing Wizard, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Screenshot of Writing Wizard, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Screenshot of Endless Alphabet 2, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Screenshot of Endless Alphabet 2, courtesy of AppsPlayground.com

Use 3 motivators from the list above and brainstorm game mechanics for the e-game for your assignment (prep-children recognising letters of the alphabet).

List the factors:

  • Desired Behaviour (eg blow away sand to reveal a letter – find the same letter in a list of letters and click on it)
  • Motivation (Mastery: Learning the letters of the alphabet; Status: receiving a badge, star, completing a level)
  • Supporters (for mastery: being able to read; for status: having your score displayed, completing a series – eg a series of green frogs)

Assessment 2

Assessment 2 – E-Game

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

Analyse Information + Assign Meta Tags – Week 5

Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com
Photo by dhester on morgueFile.com

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6

Content:

  1. Lines
  2. Lines in Design
  3. Feedback

Lines

Warm-up

We will look at lines today with fresh eyes (I hope). Line can be defined as having a starting point and an end point and the connection between the two is what the line actually is.

Lines are quite an amazing tool for many creators: when drawing the caricaturist uses lines to create his mean contortions to display a fatter, bolder, thinner, long nosed, big mouthed version of his subject. A writer uses lines to create text filled with meaning.

A graph shows the changes in the economy and an arrow points at something.

Lines can be a powerful tool of expression and we will start today’s class with a blank sheet of paper and a pencil.

Draw 5 lines to express 5 concepts, themes or emotions. Below are examples:

  • forgetfulness
  • playfulness
  • sadness
  • happiness
  • searching
  • excited
  • technology
  • nature
  • anything that you come up with …

About Lines

What is a line?

A line is a fundamental design and art element. We describe the world around us with line drawings. We draw the contour or outline of objects and shapes that we see around us to define them on a sheet of paper, a canvas or other 2D platform. This was already established by our forefathers who used the walls of caves as their canvas to depict the world around them.

Work by Egon Schiele, found at Mom.org
Work by Egon Schiele, found at Mom.org

The illustration is by Viennese artist Egon Schiele (pronounced: Sheelah) and you notice how lines are used to display the outlines and expression of a man. The lines do not exist as such in life, a person does not have a contour line around them and their eyes are not two curved lines either.

So, lines are used as a form of expression. Lines are borrowed in drawings to create shapes and outlines.

The function of a line in design (and art) goes beyond that though.

First and foremost in an abstract sense a line is something that we perceive more than view. It gives us a sense of direction. In this sense lines seem to always have one or more directions.

The swirls in the image are made up of numerous lines. Courtesy of: www.openprocessing.org
The swirls in the image are made up of numerous lines. Courtesy of: http://www.openprocessing.org

The lines in the image above seem to move from left to right if you are of a culture that reads from left to right.

Characteristics

Lines can be looked at by characteristics:

  • Length
  • Weight (darkness/thickness)
  • Direction

Basic Applications

Lines can be looked at by their basic application:

  • Outline describes the outer boundary of a two-dimensional shape.
  • Contour is the use of line to define the edge of an object and emphasize the volume or mass of the form.
  • Gestural lines are quick marks that capture the impression of a pose or movement.
  • Implied lines are suggested or broken lines that are completed with your imagination through the concept of closure. An arrow is used to suggest a direction or path for the eye to follow.
  • Calligraphy is beautiful, expressive marks. An expressive stroke freely uses the characteristics of line to convey emotion to the viewer, much like an individual’s handwriting changes with different moods.
  • Analytical line is a formal use of line. Analytical line is closer to geometry with its use of precise and controlled marks. A grid is a very popular analytical use of visual line as a way to organize a design. The Golden Section is an example of the traditional use of analytical classical line, which uses calculated implied lines to bring unity to the structure of a painting composition.
  • Modeling line is used to create the illusion of volume in drawing. Hatching is the use of parallel lines to suggest value change. Parallel lines on another angle can be added to create cross-hatching to build up a gradation and more value in areas of a drawing.
  • Directional lines suggest movement or a path of vision and have specific connotations associated with them for example: Vertical lines suggest power and authority; horizontal lines suggest peace and tranquility. Together they give a feeling of calm and stability. Diagonal lines suggest tension; curved lines are graceful and fluid. Together they create a feeling of stress and movement.
    Linear perspective can be applied to drawing to create the illusion of depth on a two-dimensional surface.  (Source: http://www.onlineartcenter.com/line.html)

Lines in Design

Look at the example below of lines in design from a Google search:

Lines Google Image Search
Lines Google Image Search

Click on the image above and save 5 -10 images to inspire you to create a Photoshop generated image that displays lines as a rhythmic component.

Before you save the file and email it to me, make sure to include the Meta Data.

Below is an example of a Photoshop generated study incorporating a portrait of the US-American actress Grace Kelly (image can be found at: GettingCheeky) with straight lines at different angles and a wallpaper found on FreeFever.com.

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study - Lines and Grace Kelly - by Federico Viola photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com

Study – Lines and Grace Kelly – by Federico Viola
photo: courtesy of GettingCheeky.com and curved lines wallpaper: courtesy of FreeFever.com


Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

C1 – Design Simple Webpage Layouts – Week 06

Banner_Cert IV WebBTech-designSimpleWebsite

Link to all Weeks     Week 1     Week 2     Week 3     Week 4      Week 5     Week 6      Link to this Unit on MyKangan

Today’s Class

  • Dreamweaver – Session 4
  • Feedback
Part of a table created in Dreamweaver. The colour is Olive.

Part of a table created in Dreamweaver. The colour is Olive.

Dreamweaver – Session 4

We will commence today’s Dreamweaver session by looking at the same content from Tuesday’s class.

Please open Dreamweaver and then transfer the content from the links below (Tables):

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

C3 – CSS and Testing Procedures – Week 05

Today’s Class

  • Assessment Task 1
  • CSS Tutorial on W3Schools.com
  • Feedback

Assessment Task 1

Continue on Assessment Task 1. Use your copy or the file below (if you have not started yet.) Assessment 1 CSS Tracking

CSS Tutorial on W3Schools.com

Today I will ask you to work through these chapters alone and fill your findings in the Assessment 1 CSS Tracking!

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!

 

Manage Quality Customer Service – Class 5

Link to all Classes     Class 1    Class 2     Class 3     Class 4     Class 5

Today’s Class

  • Assignment 2 – Customer Service
  • Feedback

Assignment 2 – Customer Service

Today I will give out the final assessment task for customer service. Please read How to handle customer complaints – TrainingMag and participate in the class activity.

Afterwards complete the assessment below:

Assessment 2 Customer Service.

Feedback

Please leave your feedback in form of a comment. Your feedback and suggestions will help me to make this blog more user friendly. Thanks!